DSM-5 RFP, Field Trial Site Recruitment

The APA recently put out an RFP on their website for field trial site recruitment to start gaining real-world insights into the impact of the proposed changes to the DSM-V.  Here is an excerpt from the story on their website: “The DSM-5 Task Force is requesting proposals from academic and large general psychiatric, mental health specialty, and medical specialty settings to participate in the field trials of proposed DSM-5 diagnostic criteria, cross-cutting dimensional measures, and diagnostic-specific severity measures.  Our objective is to assure that these proposed changes are subjected to rigorous and empirically sound field trials before DSM is released for general clinical and research use. As such, the American Psychiatric Association (APA) plans to field test the clinical utility, feasibility, reliability, and, where possible, validity of selected DSM-5 draft diagnostic criteria and associated dimensional measures across a variety of clinical settings. The initial phase of these field trials is set to begin in the summer of 2010 and continue through February 2011. The disorders selected for study in field trials include those with high public health significance and/or those with significant proposed changes to the diagnostic criteria.  A list of the diagnoses planned for testing in the field trials can be found here.  We are limiting this first round of contracted sites to U.S. locations but will consider international sites for the second wave of field trials.  However, if international sites believe that they have the resources to carry out this wave 1 protocol, we will be happy to discuss how we can facilitate their participation. An additional field trial in routine clinical practice settings covering all DSM-5...

Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD) and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual – 5th Edition (DSM-V) by Doreit S. Bialer, M.A.,OTR/L

Written by Doreit S. Bialer, M.A.,OTR/L Instructor, Summit Professional Education Sensory Processing, often referred to as Sensory Integration describes the manner in which the nervous system receives and processes information from sensory systems allowing an individual to make adaptive motor or behavioral responses. When there is a problem in the process of receiving and interpreting sensory information it is referred to as a Sensory Processing Disorder ( SPD), or sensory integrative dysfunction.   Individuals with SPD have great difficulties in performing everyday tasks and in functioning in academic, vocational, recreational and social settings. As a result many individuals with SPD exhibit anxiety, withdrawal, behavioral problems, depression, alcohol and/ or substance abuse. Based on research and collected data from the Sensory Processing Disorder Foundation, SPD affects 1 in every 20 children.  These numbers are on the rise and continue to present endless frustration and difficulties for those who suffer from the disorder.   The exact causes of SPD have not yet been identified, however extensive research from the SPD Foundation and collaborators are pointing to genetics, birth complications and environmental factors as potential causes. Sensory Processing Disorders can impact both children and adults.  It can range from being a mild disability to a more severe disorder contingent on many variables including but not limited to the number of sensory and motor systems that are affected in the disorder, the severity of the symptoms that result as a consequence of having the disorder, age of the individual, coping mechanisms and whether or not therapy has been added to the equation. The categories within the SPD umbrella range from children who poorly modulate and/...

DSM-V Interview with Dr. Alan Schatzberg, Dr. Allen Frances on PBS NewsHour

Excerpt from: PBS NewsHour Website Copyright © 1996-2010 MacNeil/Lehrer Productions JUDY WOODRUFF: Now: rethinking mental illness. For the first time in 16 years, the American Psychiatric Association is revising its essential dictionary, formally titled “The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders.” The book is used widely by mental health professionals to classify and diagnose illnesses. The proposed revisions have been a decade in the making, among them: a single category called autism spectrum disorders that would incorporate Asperger’s syndrome; a category called behavioral addictions, in which gambling would be the sole disorder; a risk syndromes category to help identify earlier stages of disorders like dementia and psychosis; and a recognition of binge eating disorder. The draft has been posted online and will be reviewed and refined over the next two years. For some perspective on the proposals and their implications, I’m joined by Dr. Alan Schatzberg. He’s president of the American Psychiatric Association. He is also chair of psychiatry at Stanford University. And Dr. Allen Frances, he’s former chief of psychiatry at the Duke University Medical Center. He led the last effort to revise the manual. Gentlemen, thank you both for being with us. And, Dr. Schatzberg, to you first. Why is this manual so important? DR. ALAN SCHATZBERG, president, American Psychiatric Association: Well, it is used by — as you pointed out, Judy, by practitioners around the world to diagnose potential patients, people who come in for treatment with specific complaints, and to classify them as having one or another disorder. It becomes the common language that mental health practitioners use to describe patients, so that we...

Asperger’s to be removed from DSM

According to numerous sources, the APA is proposing major changes today to the DSM-V. Asperger’s Disorder is likely to be eliminated, causing a more symptom-driven diagnosis. All autism-related disorders will be placed into a general category known as Autism Spectrum Disorders. “Dimensions” will now differentiate ASD including current language functioning and intellectual level/disability. One possibility is the use of autism – mild/moderate/severe, with Asperger’s being referred to as mild. PDD-NOS and Childhood Disintegrative Disorder will also now be subsumed under ASD. Here are a few links for reference: DSM V Website Psych.org Article WrongPlanet.net Article PsychCentral.com Article: A look at the DSM V...